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Skip's Adventures With "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland"

Updated: Jan 30


Skip Weisman's latest books on his reading list, including, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Before my wife and I embarked on an amazing adventure to kick off our 2024 in the "wonderland" of New Zealand, I decided it was time I read "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland;" the 19th Century classic by Lewis Carroll.

It only took me 64 years to read the "children's" story more commonly referred to today as, "Alice in Wonderland."


(The photo to the left is me at the Mudbaths of Rotorua on the North Island and below is me on the Franz Josef Glacier on the South Island).


I was amazed at my ignorance as to its impact on our every day vernacular. Many references and quotes I've heard throughout my life, some I've even used, come direct from Lewis Carroll's 19th Century children's story.


I had no idea the "Mad Hatter" was a reference from This story, as well as, "down The Rabbit Hole," and a "Cheshire Cat Grin."


I started reading "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" because I began studying Classic literature in mid-2023 in learning how to write fiction. It along with many other classic titles, kept coming up.


I figured it was about time. My wife, an avid reader of fiction throughout her life, also had never read it. She bought me a copy as a Christmas gift.


My initial reaction in reading it is that Alice's Adventures are something not something young children should be reading about. At least how they are proferred by Carroll in this book. Don't get me wrong, I'm not recommending banning or burning it. I just think I'd be discerning at what age it might be appropriate for children to read.


Now, I am not a parent and have never been so I've never needed to make those determinations. If you have, I'd love to know what age you think is most appropriate for the original story I just read, not one of Disney's movie applications of it.


I mean, half the book has the character of the Queen of Wonderland yelling, "Off with their heads," at every interaction with someone she doesn't like. What type of lesson is that teaching children?


In the end we find that little Alice is dreaming. My immediate thought upon reading its final words and closing the cover, was, "I wonder how much of "The Wizard of Oz" was based on its concept.


What is your impression of Lewis Carroll's "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland?"


Please keep the conversation going by adding a comment below and/or sharing this article with a friend.


Thanks for reading, 'til next time...





11 comentarios


Thanks, Jerry, for stopping by and being inspired to comment. I am going to have to watch the movie version and see how it differs. Always interesting to see what has to change to make it palatable for the screen.


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If I read it, it would have been many decades ago! Thanks for the post! Here's to your continued learning journey!

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Contestando a

Thanks for stopping by Andy. Great to have you hear! Best wishes for an outstanding 2024 for you and your family!

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Hi Skip, I have read Alice in Wonderland but many decades ago. I recall that the characters are a blend of characters who we deal with on a daily basis. I like the analogy to project management! It is a reread for me for certain! will give you an updated analysis!

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Contestando a

Thanks for stopping by and commenting. I am going to do a re-read to, since it's already fresh in my mind and look at it from the "blend of characters" as you mention it and William's reference to team members in a PM setting is interesting to look at as well.

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Time for me to get this classic and read it as well. Hope you are having an epic trip.

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Contestando a

Thanks, it was an epic adventure, for sure. I highly recommend getting down under. Fabulous country and the people we met were amazing.

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Skip - "Alice's Adventurers in Wonderland" features characters that mirror common personalities found in the storyland of Project Management. The Rabbit who angsts over being constantly late. The Cheshire Cat who criticizes everything while blending into the background. The Mad Hatter’s tea party with much ado about nothing. The Queen of Hearts with no heart. Does this not mimic obsession over the project schedule without considering reality, the wallflower critics who offer no solutions to the problems at hand, project meetings without any value added, and, executives who constantly abuse as a means to cover their inadequacies to manage and to lead? "Alice's Adventurers in Wonderland" should be required for all students of project management. Regards, Dr. Bill Moylan

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Hi, Bill, thanks for stopping by and commenting. I love your analogy to project team members. I am going to re-read it with an eye towards those personality types.

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